India’s Unique Advantage: Talent Pool and Government Policies Position it Strategically for Semiconductor Bets

In the first five years that the center is open, it is expected to create at least 500 jobs in advanced tech and 2,500 jobs in the manufacturing ecosystem.

It is expected that the new center in Bengaluru will be the first of its kind to focus on working with suppliers.

Prabu Raja, head of Applied Materials’ Semiconductor Products Group (SPG), said that India is a good place for the semiconductor ecosystem because it has a lot of talented people and good policies from the government.

The US-based business that helps chip manufacturers with materials engineering plans to build a collaborative engineering center in Bangalore. This center will focus on developing and selling technologies for equipment used to make semiconductors.

In the first five years that the center is open, it is expected to create at least 500 jobs in advanced tech and 2,500 jobs in the manufacturing ecosystem.

“We’ve been here twenty years. We spent many years building up our skills in product creation, engineering, and simulation. It’s more that we’re getting more confident in what we can do. Raja told Business Standard at the SemiconIndia summit in 2023, “The government incentives have sped things up and made the scale much bigger.”

As part of its planned engineering center in Bengaluru, Applied Materials has said that it will work with more than 40 manufacturers and academic institutions. The centre will be built so that suppliers can use advanced equipment and processes to test and validate their solutions. It will also provide chances for co-innovation, development, and testing of equipment subsystems and components to speed up learning cycles and speed up the adoption of new ideas.

“We are building India’s entire economy. These are sellers of high-tech goods. They offer a lot of plasma and material technologies, as well as gas flows, some of which are very important. “It’s different to bring those guys,” Raja said.

The centre in Bengaluru is likely to be the first of its kind that will focus on working with suppliers.

Raja said that even though the company had strong teams in more than one country, India was special because of its skill pool.

“Everyone agrees that there aren’t enough good engineers. India, on the other hand, has a lot of skilled people. “That’s one of the best things about India,” he said, adding, “The government is consistent and willing to change its policies to meet the needs of the industry.” The government is paying attention to the business world.”

Applied Materials has six locations in India where it does business. It also has a big organization in the country that can help with product development, research and development (R&D), information technology (IT), and operations.

When asked about plans to grow in the country, Raja replied, “We will grow if we get more people here. On top of that, we talk about making new products. Cost and speed are important factors that will have a big impact. We’ll decide how to grow based on that.”

Srinivas Satya, country president of Applied Materials India, said, “Our goal is to change the way we work with chipmakers, universities, and other partners to improve time to market, lower R&D costs, and increase the overall success rate of new technologies.” At the same time, the center will offer guidance and technical expertise to semiconductor businesses. This will help them make high-quality, cost-effective semiconductor products for both international and domestic markets, as well as create jobs for people with different levels of skill.

Also Read: Twitter Rebranding

Follow Instagram, Youtube, Twitter

 

1 thought on “India’s Unique Advantage: Talent Pool and Government Policies Position it Strategically for Semiconductor Bets”

  1. Pingback: Jet Airways Shares Surge 37%: Investors Weighing Options - Buy, Sell, or Hold?

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to Top